Blog

We apologise that the Practical Ethics in the News blog is having technical problems at the moment. We are working on these and will restore usual service as quickly as we can.  In the meantime, you might be interested in some of our other work:

Philosophers Take on the World, David Edmonds

Philosophers Take On The World

 Philosophers Take On the World is based on the Practical Ethics of the news blog and showcases some of its top posts from the last 9 years.

 Every day the news shows us provoking stories about what's going on in the world, about events which raise moral questions and problems. In Philosophers Take On the World a team of philosophers get to grips with a variety of these controversial issues, from the amusing to the shocking, in short, engaging, often controversial pieces. Covering topics from guns to abortion, the morality of drinking alone, hating a sports team, and being rude to cold callers, the essays will make you think again about the judgements we make on a daily basis and the ways in which we choose to conduct our lives.  OUP website.

Aeon Magazine
Our partnership with Aeon Magazine has produced in depth articles on topics ranging from human-pig chimeras to swearing to the importance of grandparents.

The Conversation
Our partnership with The Conversation provides an analysis of ethical issues thrown up by a wide range of current events

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Research Projects

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Established in January 2009, The Oxford Centre for Neuroethics (hosted by the Uehiro Centre) aims to address concerns about the effects neuroscience and neurotechnologies will have on various aspects of human life. Its research focuses on five key areas: cognitive enhancement; borderline consciousness and severe neurological impairment; free will, responsibility and addiction; the neuroscience of morality and decision making; applied neuroethics. See project website. ahrc60x60

Science and Religious Conflict: The past decade has seen an explosion in empirical work on moral reasoning. We are coming to understand how people's moral judgments are shaped by interactions with others in their society. There are good reasons for thinking that people's moral judgements are mostly intuitive (recent empirical work by Jonathan Haidt and his collaborators supports this view) and that people's intuitions are powerfully shaped by the institutions around them, including religious institutions. Free resources on project webpages.   

ISEThe Institute for Science and Ethics was established in June 2005 with funding from the Oxford Martin School. It is a research project based within the University of Oxford’s Faculty of Philosophy and is directed by Professor Julian Savulescu. The project has a multidisciplinary team, which includes expertise in medicine, philosophy, practical ethics, sociology and psychology. See project website.

Volkswagen StiftungThe interdisciplinary research project Intuition and Emotion in Moral Decision Making: Empirical Research and Normative Implications is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation.  The project aims to elucidate the role of emotion and intuition in moral decision-making from an empirical, historical, and philosophical perspective. See project website.

 

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